EIFL welcomes Angola
EIFL will be partnering with Angola´s Network of Media Libraries (ReMA), a network of six public media libraries in Angola to work on the creation of a national consortium, something that is already underway.

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Library delegates from Angola, including Lania da Silva, Coordinator at ReMA (middle) at the 2014 EIFL General Assembly.
Library delegates from Angola, including Lania da Silva, Coordinator at ReMA (middle) at the 2014 EIFL General Assembly.

EIFL is delighted to welcome Angola as our newest partner country.

EIFL will be partnering with Angola´s Network of Media Libraries (ReMA), a network of six public media libraries in Angola to work on the creation of a national consortium, something that is already underway. 

There are currently around 35 universities, both public and private, in the country.

ReMA, a network that is a programme of the Government of Angola, has plans to launch 19 more media libraries in all regions of the country. 

When asked why they were interested in joining EIFL, Lania da Silva, Coordinator at ReMA, stated:

‘Libraries in Angola are not yet well developed, and there are no mechanisms for cooperation between different types of libraries,’ she explained.

We believe that a partnership with EIFL will allow us to move quickly into the creation of a national library consortium that will allow us to facilitate access to electronic information resources for our library users
Lania da Silv, Coordinator at ReMA

‘ReMA was interested in establishing relationships with various international and regional organizations related to library work. We think this is the best way to learn through the experiences and good practices from other countries, to meet and assimilate existing methodological and technological developments for libraries, as well as to spread our modest experience.’

ReMA has expressed interest in three EIFL programmes to start: Consortium Management, Licensing and Open Access.

‘We are very interested in taking advantage of the experiences of EIFL’s Open Access programme to organize and facilitate access to the indigenous content,’ she said, noting that EIFL’s expertise from the Licensing programme will also be needed to advise on the choice and suitability of e-subscriptions.

However their first step is working with EIFL on the creation of a national consortium.

‘We have started networking with other libraries in the country interested in the creation of a national library consortium,’ says Lania.

‘We believe that a partnership with EIFL will allow us to move quickly into the creation of a national library consortium that will allow us to facilitate access to electronic information resources for our library users.’

Please join us in welcoming our newest partner country!